Clinics

6621 Small Business and Community Economic Development Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   S. Jones

Under faculty supervision students assume substantial responsibility for advising small businesses and nonprofit organizations. Students interview and counsel clients; draft incorporation, limited liability company, and partnership documents (such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, articles of organization, operating agreements, and partnership agreements); research local licensing requirements and zoning laws; review and draft contracts and leases; and advise on basic intellectual property issues, tax problems, and related matters. Prerequisites: Law 6250 and 6300 and permission of instructor. Law 6472 and 6474 are recommended. A grade of H, P, LP, or NC is given for this course. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6622   Public Justice Advocacy Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Gutman

Under faculty supervision, students represent clients in federal and local courts before administrative agencies in public interest litigation on behalf of low-income clients. Student responsibilities include client interviewing, factual development, legal analysis, drafting of pleadings, discovery, motions, briefs, oral advocacy, and negotiating settlements in cases. Students may also work with nonprofit and community organizations to present positions before the City Council and administrative agencies. Open to third-year students and second-year students who have completed 42 credits.  Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6623   Neighborhood Law and Policy Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   J. Steinberg

Students represent indigent clients in a range of civil matters, including welfare, disability, and housing benefits, as well as matters pertaining to offender re-entry. Student responsibilities include interviewing, fact investigation, negotiations, and conducting hearings at administrative tribunals and in D.C. Superior Court. Students may have the opportunity to participate in policy advocacy before the D.C. Council and administrative rule-making bodies. Open to third-year students and second-year students who have completed 42 credits. (Skills)

6624   Family Justice Litigation Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Kohn

Under faculty supervision, students represent indigent litigants in D.C. Superior Court. Students undertake a range of cases in the Family Court (divorce, custody, child support, alimony) and the Domestic Violence Unit (civil protection orders, modification and extension of civil protection orders, and contempt). While representing domestic violence litigants, students also have an opportunity to gain experience in criminal practice by collaborating with the U.S. Attorney’s Office in related prosecutions of accused batterers. Students are responsible for every phase of litigation, including: drafting of initial pleadings, motions, discovery, settlement negotiations, and taking the case to trial. In the weekly two-hour seminar, students study the substantive and procedural law relevant to their cases, including the local domestic violence and family law statutes, criminal law, evidentiary principles, and procedural rules. The seminar also focuses on litigation skills exercises, including performing direct and cross examinations, arguing motions, and conducting negotiations. Permission of the clinic director is required prior to registration. Prerequisites: Law 6230 and 6360. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6625   Federal, Criminal, and Appellate Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Olesen

Under supervision of the instructor, third-year students litigate appellate cases, primarily direct appeals from criminal convictions in area courts of appeal. Student responsibilities include development of the lawyer/client relationship, record review and selection of issues, briefing, and oral argument. A weekly seminar addresses through role-playing, simulation, and written exercise the lawyer’s role, ethical and procedural problems, litigation strategy, and criminal justice issues . Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: Law 6230 and 6360; Law 6650 is recommended. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6626   Vaccine Injury Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Meyers, Shoemaker

This clinic allows second- and third-year students, under faculty supervision, to represent individuals who may have suffered serious vaccine-related injuries and who are seeking damages in trial and appellate proceedings before the U.S. Court of Federal Claims. A weekly two-hour seminar focuses on multidisciplinary (medical/legal) training in vaccine injury issues, and on lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling and cross examination of medical experts. Students also work on law reform projects, including filing amicus briefs and comments on proposed new vaccine case guidelines. Students also evaluate the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program as a model for tort reform. Students must register for this clinic for both the fall and spring semesters. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6627   Environmental Law Clinic (2 or 3)   Turley

Second-, third-, and fourth-year students participate in the J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Environmental Law Clinic, representing clients in environmental litigation in both the federal and state systems. Students work under faculty supervision in administrative, trial, or appellate actions, particularly citizen suit actions. This work includes actions under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, and the Federal Facilities Compliance Act. Permission of the instructor is required prior to registration. Two or 3 hours of graded credit are given for this course. Prerequisite or concurrent registration: Law 6430. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6628–29   Clinical Teaching and Scholarship I & II (1, 2, 3, or 4)   Goldfarb

Exploration of the multiple goals of clinical education, with an intensive orientation to clinical methods and a historical and philosophical overview of clinical education. Students examine, use, and evaluate clinical pedagogies designed to meet these multiple goals and submit regular journals throughout the year. Other areas of inquiry include: the role of clinical education in legal education; the role of law school clinics in social justice issues and in communities; pedagogies for teaching and supervising lawyering in a public service context; the nature of reflective learning and the value of journals as pedagogy; and types of clinical scholarship. Enrollment limited. Open to LL.M. students serving in clinical fellowships. Law 6628 is prerequisite to Law 6629. (Writing assignments)

6630   Immigration Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Benítez

Students assume substantial responsibility for handling a range of immigration law matters, including determining what benefits or forms of relief, if any, are available to their clients, and, in appropriate circumstances, representing their clients in removal proceedings. Because the Clinic’s clients come from all over the world, cultural sensitivity is essential and foreign language skills are welcome. A minimum of 210 hours of work per semester and attendance at a two-hour weekly seminar are required. Permission of the instructor is required prior to registration. Prerequisite: Law 6538. Students may enroll in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6631   Health Rights Law Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   S. Jackson

Second-year and third-year students delve into the complex world of health law, untangling problems and explaining options to clients of the Health Insurance Counseling Project, a legal services organization that responds to more than 3,000 requests for assistance each year. Students advocate for clients who have unpaid medical bills; or who need medical care that an insurer, public or private, is unwilling to provide; or who must choose among various types of health insurance. Students learn about Medicare, Medicaid, and private health insurance law and procedures; simulation exercises hone interviewing, counseling, and advocacy skills. Students can expect to work with at least five to six clients in one semester, and should plan to devote to the course four hours per week per credit. A grade of H, P, LP, or NC is given for this course. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6633   International Human Rights Clinic (4, 5, or 6)   Carillo

Under faculty supervision, students work in a clinical setting in partnership with experienced attorneys and specialized institutions engaged in human rights activism on case projects drawn primarily from one of two main areas: (1) litigation and advocacy before international human rights tribunals and treaty bodies, primarily in the Inter-American and United Nations human rights systems; or (2) human rights litigation and advocacy in the United States, especially in relation to the Trafficking Victims Protection Act. Prerequisite: Law 6520. Recommended courses include: 6546, 6547 and/or completion of the GW–Oxford International Human Rights Law Program. (Skills)

6634   Law Students in Court (4, 5, or 6)   D. Johnson

This is a clinical program in trial advocacy, that offers students the opportunity to develop skills as a trial lawyer while representing indigent persons in the Superior Court of the District of Columbia. Students may participate in either the civil section (which focuses primarily upon the representation of tenants in landlord–tenant actions, but also handles some consumer, negligence, and other civil matters) or the criminal section (in which student litigators defend persons charged with misdemeanor offenses). Students in both sections have the opportunity to participate in jury trials. They are responsible for all aspects of litigation under the supervision of clinical instructors: interviewing clients and witnesses, conducting investigations, preparing pleadings, engaging in settlement negotiations or plea bargaining, and conducting all motions hearings and trials pursuant to the Superior Court’s third-year practice rule. Only third-year students who have completed Law 6230 and 6360 may participate in the clinic. Seminars are held in the evening. Students must have one day per week available for court appearances and plan to devote approximately four hours per credit to the clinic. Students must participate in the program for two consecutive semesters. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. Enrollment is limited students. Students who select the civil division must enroll for a total of 10 credits.  Students who select the criminal division must enroll for a total of 12 credits. Each division is graded CR/NC basis in the fall (4 credits for civil division, 6 credits for criminal division), and each division is graded on letter grade basis for 6 credits in the spring. (Skills)

6635   Disabled People and the Law (2)

Examination of those areas in which persons with disabilities have traditionally been denied some right or benefit afforded other persons in our society and have resorted to legal action; introduction to statutes and agencies designed to protect people with disabilities. Students may choose to prepare a research paper (and receive legal writing credit and a numerical grade) or to gain practical experience doing a clinical project (on a CR/NC basis). Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors. (Skills)

6638   Intensive Clinical Placement

Projects involving litigation, research, or public interest activities of a legal nature (including aid to indigents, support of public interest nonprofit corporations, and support of governmental agencies or courts) may be initiated and will be supervised by a faculty member. Projects must be approved in advance by the Law School Supervisory Committee (three members) both as to whether the project is appropriate and as to the number of credit hours to be granted. A maximum of 10 credit hours may be taken in one or two semesters. This course is open to a limited number of third-year students. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Students may enroll concurrently in this course and Law 6668 only with permission of both instructors.


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