Skills & Simulation

Note: only those courses identified by the designastion "(Skills)" following the course description may satisfy the Professional Skills Requirement.

6640 Trial Advocacy (3)   Saltzburg, Austin, Campbell, Gilligan, Horn, Minionis, Naughton, Rankin, Schreiber, Shaffer, Urbina, Wayne, White

Pretrial and trial techniques with emphasis on procedural, evidentiary, tactical, and ethical problems experienced by trial lawyers in actual cases. Complaint drafting, pretrial motions, depositions and other discovery methods, preparation of witnesses, jury selection, the use of experts, direct and cross-examination, introduction of documents, courtroom techniques, and opening and closing arguments. Role playing in simulated courtroom situations. Once registered, no student may drop this course without permission of the dean of students. Prerequisite: Law 6230; Saltzburg—students may be enrolled concurrently in Law 6230. Enrollment is limited. (Short papers and exercises) (Skills)

6642   Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Competition (1)   D. Johnson

Participants in intrascholastic and interscholastic ADR competitions may register for this course and receive 1 credit for each competition in which they participate. A student successfully advancing from a regional to a national competition must register for this course again to receive 1 additional credit for participation in the national. All students competing must complete and submit an Intent to Compete form available in the Dean of Students Office. In no event may a student receive more than a total of 3 credits for intra- and interscholastic competitions under Law 6642, 6644, and/or 6645, nor may a student participate in more than one such competition in any given semester. Once registered, no student may drop this course without permission of the dean of students. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis.

6643   Pre-Trial Advocacy (2 or 3)   A. Robinson, Gardner, LoRe, Rainey

Pre-trial and trial techniques of civil discovery and motions practice by role-playing in simulated cases. The class is divided into “law firms” that represent clients in cases at the pre-trial stage. Students are required to attend pre-trial conferences and conduct extensive discovery, including conduct of depositions, argument on discovery motions to compel or sanctions, preparation and service of interrogatories, requests for production, requests for admissions, and motions for physical and mental examinations. The course ends with a five-hour mock trial by jury. (Simulation and paper) (Skills)

6644   Moot Court (1)   D. Gordon, D. Johnson, Yukins

The Moot Court Board sponsors four upper-level, intrascholastic competitions each year: the Van Vleck Constitutional Law Moot Court Competition, the Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, the Giles Sutherland Rich Intellectual Property Law Moot Court Competition, and the Government Contracts Moot Court Competition. Participants earn 1 credit for each competition in which they participate, regardless of how they finish. Participants in the Jessup Competition and the Giles Sutherland Rich Competition who compete in the regional rounds must register for this course again, and receive 1 credit in addition to the credit earned for participating in the in-house competition. All students competing must complete and submit an Intent to Compete form available in the Dean of Students Office. Only current members of the Moot Court Board may petition to receive Moot Court Board funds to attend external competitions, unless approval is otherwise granted by the dean of students. In no event may a student receive more than a total of 3 credits for intra- and interscholastic competitions under Law 6642, 6644, and/or 6645, nor may a student participate in more than one such competition in any given semester. Once registered, no student may drop this course without permission of the dean of students. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis.

6645   Mock Trial Competition (1)   D. Johnson

The Mock Trial Board sponsors the intrascholastic Cohen & Cohen Mock Trial Competition in the fall semester. The competition offers students an opportunity to practice trial skills and serves as a basis for selection of teams to represent the Law School at various interscholastic trial competitions. The competition requires a two-person team to prepare a written trial brief and argue its case before a judge and jury. The competition also provides a seminar on trial advocacy skills, strategies, and techniques. Students who participate in the fall competition receive 1 credit. Those students attending interscholastic trial competitions must register for this course again, and receive 1 credit for each competition in which they participate. All students competing must complete and submit an Intent to Compete form available in the Dean of Students Office. In no event may a student receive more than a total of 3 credits for intra- and interscholastic competitions under Law 6642, 6644, and/or 6645, nor may a student participate in more than one such competition in any given semester. Once registered, no student may drop this course without permission of the dean of students. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis.

6646   Mediation (2)   Drucker, Green, B. Harvey, Terry

Consideration of the growing use of mediation to resolve disputes and comparison with other dispute resolution processes. Taking the roles of mediators and disputants, students participate in a number of simulations. Mock mediations are conducted individually and with a co-mediator. Examination of practical and ethical issues; applicability to various substantive areas including contract, tort, consumer, family, criminal, discrimination, and landlord/tenant. Students are expected to fill out role-playing evaluations of themselves and classmates on a regular basis and to prepare written assignments as directed by the instructor. Enrollment is limited. Students may take both Law 6646 and 6647 from the same instructor only with the instructor’s permission. (Skills)

6647   Alternative Dispute Resolution (2 or 3)   Drucker, Hoffman

Theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating and mediating transactions and disputes. Techniques studied include neutral evaluation, regulatory negotiations, mini-trials, settlement judge approaches, arbitration, and other “hybrids.” Students participate in a number of simulated disputes related to various practice areas, both in and outside of class. Enrollment is limited. Students may take Law 6647 and either 6646 or 6648 from the same instructor only with the instructor’s permission. (Role playing and written assignments) (Skills)

6648   Negotiations (1, 2, or 3)   Craver, Juni, A. Abramowitz, Linkins, Ray, Sylvester

Examination of the negotiation process employed by legal practitioners. The assigned text considers the negotiation process, negotiating techniques, verbal and nonverbal communication, and other factors that influence these interpersonal transactions. Students engage in negotiation exercises that enable them to practice the art of negotiating and to examine their personal strengths and weaknesses. Grades are determined in meaningful part by the results obtained, vis-a-vis other class members, from these exercises. Students are also required to prepare a short paper on a topic pertaining to the negotiation process. Enrollment is limited. Students may take both Law 6648 and 6647 from the same instructor only with the instructor’s permission. Credit may not be earned for both Law 6648 and 6458. (Skills)

6650   Client Interviewing and Counseling (2)   Dennis, Privor, Schamel, Stewart

Practice with gathering and evaluating facts supplied by clients, followed by presentations of advice based on consideration of facts and applicable law. Discussion of interpersonal aspects of client relations and ethical problems that may arise in the context of client interviews. Students participate in simulated interviews, portraying both clients and attorneys. A paper discussing some aspect of the interviewing and counseling process is required. Enrollment is limited. (Simulation and paper) (Skills)

6652   Legal Drafting (2 or 3)   Berl, Guberman, Leo, Lynch, Parker, Rich, R. Smith, Turner, Wintrol, Yu, Zoltick

Students learn the fundamental skills necessary to draft litigation and transactional documents. Practical application of the drafting process to the preparation of litigation documents, such as pleadings and motions, and transactional documents, such as contracts, deeds, wills, or other agreements. Topics include planning and structuring a document, legal research strategies, the role of procedural rules, plain language initiatives, and ethical principles that affect the drafting process. Specialized sections of this course are offered in areas such as litigation, criminal litigation, transactional, and intellectual property; students are encouraged to discuss course coverage with the professor prior to enrollment. Students will be limited to registration of one legal drafting course while enrolled at the law school. (Drafting projects and short writing exercises) (Skills)

6653   Advanced Appellate Advocacy (2)

Intensive study of appellate process, brief writing, and argumentation. Focus on techniques for creating and structuring an appellate brief and developing effective arguments to support a client’s position and refute an opposing party’s position on appeal. Topics include developing a theory of the case and developing arguments based on precedent. Strategic considerations of appellate briefs and effective oral argument. (Appellate briefs and oral argument) (Skills)

6655   Advanced Legal Research (2)   Lee, Norwood, Rodriguez, H. Somers

Intensive review of legal research tools and methods involving both digital and print resources. This course reviews general categories of materials, including reporters, codes, and secondary sources, and their place in contemporary law practice. Students will explore methods of conducting research in specific areas of the law. (Research exercises and paper) (Skills)

6656   Independent Legal Writing (1 or 2)

Preparation of a research paper under the supervision of a member of the faculty who will determine, prior to registration, whether the work required for the topic justifies 1 or 2 credit hours. If elected for 1 credit hour, this course may be repeated for 2 credit hours to meet the legal writing requirement for the J.D. degree. Students who elect to repeat this course for 1 or 2 credit hours are required to produce an additional free-standing research paper in connection with the repeated course. Approval by the faculty supervisor is required prior to registration; if the faculty supervisor is a member of the part-time faculty, approval is also required from the senior associate dean for academic affairs or associate dean for academic affairs. Compliance with the legal writing requirement as outlined in this Bulletin is necessary if the course is used to satisfy that requirement. Students may not take more than a total of 2 credits of independent legal writing In their degree program under the supervision of part-time faculty members. (Research paper)

6657   Scholarly Writing (1)   Thornton

Introduction to writing for scholarly legal journals. Topic selection, research strategies, organization, style, grammar, usage, and the editing process. This course reflects journal participation for second-year students on all journals. Satisfactory completion of Law 6658, 6659, 6660, 6661, 6662, 6663, 6664, or 6667 in the third year is required to receive credit for this course. A grade of H, P, LP, or NC is given for this course.

6658   Law Review (1 or 2)   B. Clark

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the Law Review. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6659   International Law Review (1 or 2)   Steinhardt

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the International Law Review. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6660   Federal Circuit Bar Journal (1 or 2)   Schwartz, Whealan

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the Federal Circuit Bar Journal. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6661   Public Contract Law Journal (1 or 2)   Schooner, Yukins

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the Public Contract Law Journal. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6662   Intellectual Property Law Journal (1 or 2)   Schaffner

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the American Intellectual Property Law Association Quarterly Journal. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6663   International Law in Domestic Courts Journal (1 or 2)   Shelton

Limited to members of the student staff of the International Law in Domestic Courts Project. A maximum of 4 credits may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll concurrently in Law 6520 and 6657. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis.

6664   Journal of Energy and Environmental Law (1 or 2)   Paddock

Limited to third-year members of the student staff of the Journal of Energy and Environmental Law. A maximum of 2 credit hours may be earned in this course. Second-year students must enroll in Law 6657 to reflect journal participation. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. Satisfactory completion of Law 6657 in the second year and satisfactory completion of all journal work in the third year is required to receive CR for this course.

6665   Upper-Level Writing (1)   Thornton

This course is an elective corequisite to seminar courses that require or permit a research paper or Law 6656, Independent Legal Writing, for students who intend to seek publication. Instruction on legal research strategies and structural techniques; individual and small-group feedback on interim writing assignments; and guidance on seeking publications. Credit may not be earned for both this course and Law 6657. Permission of the instructor of the course for which the research paper is to be written is required. Enrollment is limited. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis. (Writing Assignments)

6666   Research and Writing Fellow (1 or 2)   DeSanctis, Gambert

Limited to students selected to assist in teaching first-year Legal Research and Writing (Law 6216) and Introduction to Advocacy (Law 6217). Two credit hours may be earned in both the fall and spring semesters. This course is graded on a CR/NC basis.


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