Craig S. Iscoe

Craig S. Iscoe

Title: Professorial Lecturer in Law

Address: 2000 H Street, N.W, Washington, DC 20052
Email: ciscoe@law.gwu.edu

Education
B.A., University of Texas; J.D., Stanford Law School; LL.M., Georgetown University Law Center

Biographical Sketch
Judge Iscoe was appointed to the Superior Court of the District of Columbia in 2003. He received his law degree from Stanford Law School in 1978 and Master of Laws from Georgetown in 1979. Following law school, Judge Iscoe began a fellowship at Georgetown University Law Center’s Institute for Public Representation and later joined the Federal Trade Commission, where he worked on cigarette advertising issues. In 1982, Judge Iscoe joined the law firm Arent Fox, where he worked on communications issues and general litigation.

Judge Iscoe became an assistant United States attorney in 1984 where he tried a wide variety of criminal cases such as armed robbery, drug distribution, and homicide. He later investigated and tried offenses in the office’s Transnational/Major Crimes Section, including the nation’s first prosecution under the federal flag-burning statute.

In 1997, Judge Iscoe worked as an associate deputy attorney general in the Justice Department before returning to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in 2001, where he led an investigation resulting in six California residents pleading guilty to conspiring to commit money laundering in connection with a nationwide telemarketing fraud scheme.

Judge Iscoe has served as an assistant professor at Vanderbilt Law School, an adjunct professor at Georgetown University, and has taught at the National Institute for Trial Advocacy. He also has made several presentations in Eastern Europe on behalf of the Justice Department and the American Bar Association, training judges and prosecutors in Poland, Slovakia, and Croatia in the investigation and prosecution of public corruption and corporate criminal offenses. In addition, he writes an annual summary of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure. Judge Iscoe is a Master in the Edward Bennett Williams Inn of Court.