In the Spotlight


Analyzing This Term's Supreme Court Rulings

Analyzing This Term's Supreme Court Rulings | The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are adjourning for the summer after delivering 76 opinions this term on a wide range of issues. This month, the court ruled on two highly scrutinized cases: King v. Burwell, which impacted a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, and Obergefell v. Hodges, which granted the national right to same-sex marriage. GW Law faculty members have actively tracked these and other cases throughout the term and shared their expertise with the media.

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Supreme Court Affirms Same-Sex Marriage

Supreme Court Affirms Same-Sex Marriage | On Friday morning, the Supreme Court handed down a 5-4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, the consolidated cases regarding marriage equality for same-sex couples in the United States. Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy held that marriage is a fundamental right protected under the Fourteenth Amendment. Alan Morrison, Lerner Family Associate Dean for Public Interest and Public Service Law, answered GW Today’s questions about the decision and its consequences.

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Professor Finds Flaw in AIG Ruling

Professor Finds Flaw in AIG Ruling | On June 15, Judge Thomas Wheeler issued a decision in the high-profile AIG bailout case, but that ruling has a critical problem according to Visiting Associate Professor of Law Michael P. Goodman. In an op-ed for National Law Journal, Professor Goodman points out that the case—based on the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment—must be decided by an Article III judge with a lifetime appointment. Judge Wheeler serves on the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, an Article I court subject to the control of Congress and the president. Professor Goodman's conclusion is based on research described in one of his recent papers in the Villanova Law Review.

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Baseball's Hacking Case: Are You a Hacker Too?

Baseball's Hacking Case: Are You a Hacker Too? | Daniel J. Solove, John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law, writes about the St. Louis Cardinals "hack" into a Houston Astros database. Cardinals employees allegedly used known passwords to access the Astros' database, an act prohibited by the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, which imposes penalties whenever a person intentionally accesses a computer without permission. "People need basic literacy in privacy and security," writes Professor Solove. "The Cardinals personnel might not have known that what they were doing was illegal—and I definitely bet they didn't know how severe the consequences could be. The Astros personnel didn't know some basic ways to protect data security."

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On the Hill: Professor Glicksman Testifies on Ozone Pollution

On the Hill: Professor Glicksman Testifies on Ozone Pollution | Robert Glicksman, J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Professor of Environmental Law, testified on Capitol Hill about the Environmental Protection Agency's pending proposal to strengthen air quality standards for ozone. The hearing took place before a joint session of the House Energy and Commerce Committee's Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade and its Subcommittee on Energy and Power. Professor Glicksman's testimony argued for a strong national ozone pollution standard, pointing out that it fulfills public health goals and provides economic benefits.

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News & Events

With several events taking place each day, GW Law is a hub of legal activity. From moot court competitions judged by Supreme Court justices to lectures by prominent legal minds to career development programs, the Law School is always abuzz with activities that benefit students, faculty, and the GW community.

 

What To Do With Unused Embryos?

What To Do With Unused Embryos?

A few months ago, "Modern Family" star Sofia Vergara and her ex-fiance Nick Loeb had a public dispute over whether to use their frozen embryos created through in vitro fertilization. This type of disagreement is becoming more common across the country with the increasing popularity of embryo freezing—a procedure that is now completely covered by some companies. Naomi Cahn, Harold H. Greene Professor of Law, joined NPR's "Diane Rehm Show" to unravel the complicated moral and legal questions about what to do with unused embryos.


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News Stories


Analyzing This Term's Supreme Court Rulings
The justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are adjourning for the summer after delivering 76 opinions this term on a wide range of issues. This month, the court ruled on two highly scrutinized cases: King v. Burwell, which impacted a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, and Obergefell v. Hodges, which granted the national right to same-sex marriage. GW Law faculty members have actively tracked these and other cases throughout the term and shared their expertise with the media.
June 29, 2015 . Read more

Supreme Court Affirms Same-Sex Marriage
On Friday morning, the Supreme Court handed down a 5-4 decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, the consolidated cases regarding marriage equality for same-sex couples in the United States. Writing for the majority, Justice Anthony Kennedy held that marriage is a fundamental right protected under the Fourteenth Amendment. Alan Morrison, Lerner Family Associate Dean for Public Interest and Public Service Law, answered GW Today’s questions about the decision and its consequences.
June 26, 2015 . Read more

Professor Finds Flaw in AIG Ruling
On June 15, Judge Thomas Wheeler issued a decision in the high-profile AIG bailout case, but that ruling has a critical problem according to Visiting Associate Professor of Law Michael P. Goodman. In an op-ed for National Law Journal, Professor Goodman points out that the case—based on the takings clause of the Fifth Amendment—must be decided by an Article III judge with a lifetime appointment. Judge Wheeler serves on the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, an Article I court subject to the control of Congress and the president. Professor Goodman's conclusion is based on research described in one of his recent papers in the Villanova Law Review.
June 22, 2015 . Read more


» View all News Stories

Faculty in the News


PolitiFact . July 01, 2015
Jonathan Turley is quoted about the dangers to free speech that come with expanding definitions of hate speech. More

The New York Times . July 01, 2015
Naomi Cahn is quoted about a comparison of family structure in politically liberal and conservative states. More

The Christian Science Monitor . July 01, 2015
Robert Tuttle is quoted about the possibility of conservative religious colleges losing tax-exempt status because of the Supreme Court same-sex marriage ruling. More

American Banker . July 01, 2015
Arthur Wilmarth is quoted about legislative dangers to Dodd-Frank. More

"The Diane Rehm Show" . June 30, 2015
Naomi Cahn is interviewed about what to do with unused frozen embryos. More

Slate . June 29, 2015
David Fontana writes about pushing social progress through the courts. More

The Huffington Post . June 29, 2015
Sara Rosenbaum is quoted about the King v. Burwell ruling. More

CNN . June 29, 2015
Jonathan Turley is interviewed about a Supreme Court ruling that upheld the use of an execution drug. More

The Christian Science Monitor . June 27, 2015
Robert Tuttle is quoted about potential lawsuits in the wake of the Supreme Court ruling on marriage equality. More

"The Takeaway" . June 26, 2015
Jeffrey Rosen is interviewed about the Supreme Court ruling that same-sex couples have the right to marry in all 50 states. More

CNN . June 26, 2015
Jonathan Turley is interviewed about the Supreme Court’s ruling on marriage equality.More

San Francisco Chronicle . June 26, 2015
Jonathan Turley is mentioned in an article about the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Affordable Care Act. More


» View all Faculty in the News


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Upcoming Events

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Thursday
GW Law in London

Join the GW Law Alumni Association, Dean Blake D. Morant, and Associate Dean for International and Comparative Legal Studies Susan L. Karamanian for a reception and dinner in London.

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Join the GW Black Law Alumni Association for an alumni reception during the 90th Annual National Bar Association Convention in Los Angeles.

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