Jonathan R. Siegel

Portrait of Jonathan R. Siegel
Title:
F. Elwood and Eleanor Davis Research Professor of Law
Address:
2000 H Street, NW
Washington, District Of Columbia 20052
United States
Phone:
202-994-7453
Fax:
202-994-5614
Email:
[email protected]
Website:
http://www.jsiegel.net

Jonathan R. Siegel joined the law school in 1995, following four years as a member of the Appellate Staff, Civil Division, of the U.S. Department of Justice. At Justice, he briefed and argued appellate cases on behalf of the president and numerous other government officials and agencies. Prior to that, he served as a law clerk to Chief Judge Patricia M. Wald of the District of Columbia Circuit. Professor Siegel’s interests include civil procedure, federal jurisdiction, administrative law, and intellectual property.

Publications

Education

BA Harvard University; JD, Yale University

In the News

"Texas Abortion Law Again In Effect After Appeals Court Temporarily Pauses Injunction Against State"

October 08, 2021

Jonathan R. Siegel is quoted in the Wall Street Journal about the Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reinstating Texas's abortion ban after a federal district judge granted an injunction against it.

"VERIFY: No, the Filibuster Does Not Appear Anywhere in the Constitution"

June 24, 2021

Jonathan R. Siegel discusses with WUSA9 the origin of the filibuster and whether it is listed anywhere in the Constitution.

"Why the Talking Filibuster Won’t Solve Democrats’ Problems"

March 19, 2021
Jonathan R. Siegel writes in Slate that bringing back the talking filibuster will not help Senate Democrats move forward their legislative priorities.

"Trump’s Orders Limiting Agency Guidance Pose Uncertain Impact For EPA"

October 11, 2019

Jonathan R. Siegel is quoted by Inside EPA on how government agencies could find new guidance document regulations burdensome.

"Federal Workers Brace for New Push on Trump Anti-Labor Goals"

September 02, 2018

Jonathan R. Siegel is quoted in The New York Times about a judge rebuffing efforts to impose tighter labor rules in federal agencies.